2 INDIANHEAD THE INDIANHEAD July 2018 vol. 55, issue 7 PHOTO OF THE MONTH (Photo of the Month) 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "2 INDIANHEAD THE INDIANHEAD July 2018 vol. 55, issue 7 PHOTO OF THE MONTH (Photo of the Month) 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division"

Transcription

1 july 2018 VOL. 55, ISSUE 7 HEADQUARTERS, CAMP RED CLOUD, REPUBLIC OF KOREA INDIANHEAD SERVING THE 2ND INFANTRY DIVISION COMMUNITY SINCE INACTIVATION CEREMONY

2 2 INDIANHEAD THE INDIANHEAD July 2018 vol. 55, issue 7 PHOTO OF THE MONTH (Photo of the Month) 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division celebrated the U.S. Army s 243rd Birthday June 14 at the Tomahawk Dining Facility on Camp Humphreys with cake cutting by the youngest and oldest Raider Soldiers and a special Surf n Turf meal. (Cover photo) The U.S. Army Garrison Camp Red Cloud held an inactivation ceremony at the Village Green June 21. The ceremony is a milestone in the transformation and relocation process agreed upon by U.S. and ROK governments. (U.S. Army Photo by Mr. Pak, Chin U., 2ID/ RUCD Public Affairs) Features 03 Independence Day Message 04 Indianhead Legacy 05 New Policy on Tuition Assistance 06 Taste of Cultural Awareness 07 Camp Casey partners up with local school 08 First-Ever 2ID/RUCD Battle Staff 10 Champions in Sustainment 11 2ID/RUCD Welcomes A New Chaplain 12 New Warrior Commanders 14 DCG Patch Ceremony at New HQs 16 Historic Casing of the Camp Red Cloud Colors rd Army Birthday Celebration 20 Travel Seoul 21 Regiment Page 6 CAMP RED CLOUD, Republic of Korea Soldiers prepare traditional Korean beef bulgogi and seafood pancake dishes after receiving a class at Kyungmin University June 12. (U.S. Army Photo by Sgt. Raquel Villalona, 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs)

3 INDIANHEAD Maj. Gen. D. Scott McKean Commanding General 2nd Infantry Division july Command Sgt. Maj. Phil K. Barretto Command Sergeant Major 2nd Infantry Division Lt. Col. Junel R. Jeffrey Public Affairs Officer Master Sgt. Vin Stevens Public Affairs Chief PUBLICATION STAFF Staff Sgt. Micah J. Van Dyke Managing Editor Sgt. Raquel Villalona Editor Cpl. Mun, Hyung Bin Editor Pvt. Park, Seung Ho Korean Language Editor Like us on Facebook! 2nd Infantry Division (Official Page) Do you have a story to tell? If you would like to share your experiences in Korea with the division, please contact your public affairs office. Visit The Indianhead magazine is an authorized publication for members of the Department of Defense. Editorial content is the responsibility of the 2nd Infantry Division Public Affairs Office. Contents of the publication are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by the U.S. Government, or the Department of the Army. This publication is printed monthly by the Il Sung Company, Ltd., Seoul, Republic of Korea. Individuals can submit articles by the following means: usarmy.redcloud.2-id.list. mail EAID-SPA, 2nd Infantry Division, Unit 15041, APO, AP Attn: Indianhead; or visit the 2ID Public Affairs Office located in Building T-507 on Camp Red Cloud. To arrange for possible coverage of an event, call

4 44 THE INDIANHEAD LEGACY PAGE JULY 17, 1968 Soldiers from the 98th RCT repelled 4 North Korean agents as they tried to infiltrate the Republic of Korea s border and sow dissent. During this period, North Korea was especially persistent with its incursions into alliance territory. Also the Army offered Soldiers of the division an early-out provision in their enlistment contracts to help meet the demands of Army retention and give Soldiers the opportunity to move on with another chapter of their careers. JULY 9, 1979 President Jimmy Carter visited the 2nd Infantry Division in the Republic of Korea and was impressed with what he saw. The president is pictured running with the troops and gave glowing reviews of troop morale and readiness.

5 THE INDIANHEAD 5 THE WAIT IS OVER: NEW POLICY MAKES TUITION ASSISTANCE READILY AVAILABLE TO SOLDIERS Spc. Roger Houghton, 20th Public Affairs Detachment, 2nd Infantry Division, visits the Go Army Ed website Jun. 26, on Camp Humphreys. The new Tuition Assistance policy goes into effect on Aug. 5 and TA will be available immediately to Soldiers of all components after Advance Individual Training, Basic Officer Leaders Course, or Warrant Officer Basic Course assuming they meet existing eligibility. STORY AND PHOTO BY Spc. ShaTyra Reed 20th Public Affairs Detachment CAMP HUMPHREYS, Republic of Korea Soldiers will no longer have to wait one year after completing Advance Individual Training, Basic Officer Leaders Course, or Warrant Officer Basic Course to receive tuition assistance. According to Army Directive (Army Tuition Assistance Policy) of June 6, beginning Aug. 5: TA will be available immediately to Soldiers of all components after AIT, BOLC, or WOBC assuming they meet existing eligibility requirements; are not under suspension of favorable personnel actions in accordance with Army Regulation ; and have enough time left in service to complete the courses they are signing up for. This opens up more opportunities for Soldiers, said Teal Hart, Camp Casey Education Center counselor. The old policy wasn t an equitable rule for all Soldiers because there are some Soldiers whose AIT is 2 months and others whose AIT is a year, so the new policy is a big benefit. Soldiers who wish to use TA in order to pursue a master s degree will no longer have to wait 10 years. Instead, Soldiers will have to keep up with their professional military education requirements. Soldiers who have graduated from Advance Leaders Course, Captains Career Course, or Warrant Officer Advance Course will immediately be eligible to receive TA for graduate-level coursework. If getting an education helps the Soldier advance in their profession on the military side, then the sooner they can get started, the sooner they can get their professional development on track and increase their opportunities in the Army, said Hart. Soldiers using tuition assistance will now fall into one of two tiers. Tier 1 Soldiers are either working on their first bachelor s degree or have earned an undergraduate degree without TA and wish to pursue a master s degree. Tier 2 Soldiers have used TA for any part of their undergraduate degrees and are working toward a graduate certificate or master s degree. Soldiers can t use TA to pursue a second bachelor s degree or any doctoral degree, nor can they double up and request TA while they are on orders in a fully funded degree program. Pvt. Morgan Channels, a Cleveland native, unit supply specialist in the 602nd Aviation Support Battalion, 2nd Combat Aviation Brigade, said she enjoys the military s educational benefits and the new TA policy makes it easier for her to begin college as early as August. Soldiers will still be limited to 16 semester hours each fiscal year at a rate of $250 per semester hour and can only use TA to pursue one postsecondary degree or certificate at a time. For more information at TA or enrolling in college, Soldiers should contact their installation education office.

6 6 THE INDIANHEAD TasTE OF CulTural awareness STORY AND PHOTOS BY Sgt. Raquel Villalona 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs Pvt. William Washington, Freemont, California native and culinary specialist presents a seafood pancake he made from scratch during the Head Start Program at Kyungmin University in Uijeongbu June 12. The elite Seoul Taekwondo Team teaches Soldiers blocking techniques during the Head Start Program at Kyungmin University in Uijeongbu June 14. The Head Start Program, originally established in 2006, is a U.S. Forces Korea language, history, and culture education program supported by Gyonggi Provincial Government and Pyeongtaek City. CAMP RED CLOUD, Republic of Korea A group of newly-arrived Soldiers embarked on a three-day cultural awareness, ROK-U.S. partnership enrichment experience June The Head Start Program, originally established in 2006, is a U.S. Forces Korea language, history, and culture education program supported by Gyeonggi Provincial Government and Pyeongtaek City. The program is hosted by Pyeongtaek University, Kyungmin University, and Shinhan University. The goal is to make Soldiers better ambassadors by gaining a better understanding of Korean society and culture. Twenty 2nd Infantry Division ROK-U.S. Combined Division Soldiers arrived at Kyungmin University in Uijeongbu where they were welcomed by musical performances from the university s Department of Music and Acting. The group also participated in a traditional Korean cuisine cooking class where they received instruction, prepared, and cooked their own beef bulgogi and seafood pancake dishes. Pvt. William Washington, a Freemont, California native and culinary specialist, took great pride in creating the dishes from scratch. It was an unexpected bonus to have a cooking class, said Washington. When I arrived in Korea, I never anticipated the opportunity to learn how to cook a traditional dish at a school. The cultural class also afforded the group the chance to take a guided tour of the United Nations War Memorial of Korea. It s one thing to read or hear about the Korean War, but the tour really allowed us to experience its relevancy and how it pertains to our mission with the ROK-U.S. alliance, said 1st Lt. Makensie Beasley, a New Orleans native and signal communications officer. It was an eye-opening experience seeing the uniforms, weaponry, and equipment used during the Korean War that my great uncle fought in alongside many of the faces seen in the memorial. The program also includes language classes, a session on the Status of Forces Agreement (SOFA), and a taekwondo martial art lesson. The Head Start Program really sparked my interest in Korean culture; I just wanted to learn more; take more taekwondo classes; engage the people, said Pvt. Joey M. Mendoza, native of Harlem and communication specialist. This is my first duty assignment so I didn t know what to expect coming to Korea, but now I see there is plenty to explore both intellectually and geographically. Cultural awareness helps make Soldiers better ambassadors and strengthen the partnership with our host nation counterparts. The Head Start Program continues to build trust and mutual understanding around the peninsula. Katchi Kapshida Forward Together!

7 july CAMP CASEY PARTNERS UP WITH LOCAL SCHOOL Soldiers from 3rd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team and volunteers took a group photo to commemorate their time with Korean students at the Camp Casey Theater during the English camp visit on June 6. (Photo by Cpl. Seong Joon Kim, 1ABCT Public Affairs) STORY BY Staff Sgt. Quanesha Barnett 1ABCT Public Affairs CAMP CASEY, Republic of Korea The United States Army Garrison Camp Casey invited approximately 40 Korean students from Dongducheon to Camp Casey for a one-day English camp on June 6. Aimed at immersing students in an English environment, the camp is a good neighbor program that allows close coordination for Soldiers and Dongducheon citizens as they continue to strengthen their relationship. Soldiers and KATUSAs from 3rd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 3rd Infantry Division facilitated this year s English camp. The Soldiers showed the students their M1A2 Abrams main battle tanks and M2 Bradley Fighting Vehicles. Communicating in English, the KATUSAs and Soldiers explained how they operated each piece of equipment, and how to conduct preventive maintenance checks and services before operating military equipment. The students climbed into the tanks and Bradleys to get an understanding on how it feels to sit while driving a military vehicle. I am glad we got the opportunity to invite our neighbors to Camp Casey and show the community how we work as a team in Korea, said Capt. Ronald Feher, commander of 3-69 AR Headquarters and Headquarters Company. The excitement that I saw from the students, Soldiers and KATUSAs lets me know that we will continue to build a stronger relationship with our community and continue to help support the English camp. After leaving the motor pool, the students received a tour of Camp Casey before entering Casey Gym. There, the students, Soldiers and KATUSAs played basketball and took time to get to know each other and ask questions. Before concluding the camp, Lt. Col. William Coryell, the 3-69 AR commander, spoke with each individual student at Casey Theater and asked him or her questions about the camp before presenting them with a Certificate of Attendance. Soldiers from the 3rd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment, 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, talk with local Korean students about the M2/M3 Bradley Camp Casey during the English camp visit on June 6. (Photo by Cpl. Seong Joon Kim, 1ABCT Public Affairs) I am glad my battalion got the opportunity to show you how we operate equipment on the Peninsula, said Lt. Col. William Coryell, commander of 3rd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment. We re thankful to host the English camp students, and we really appreciate being a part of the community.

8 8 THE INDIANHEAD 2ID/RUCD hosted the Battle Staff Noncommissioned Officer Course Graduates and assistant instructors pose for a photo with Command Sgt. Maj. Phil K. Barretto, 2ID/RUCD command sergeant major (right) prior to a commencement ceremony at the installation theater June 28. FIRST-EVER 2ID/RUCD BATTLE STAFF COURSE STORY BY Sgt. Raquel Villalona 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs PHOTOS BY Pvt. Park, Seung Ho 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs CAMP RED CLOUD, Republic of Korea Leaders walked across the stage armed with tools to level the playing field in intricate operations. Sixteen 2nd Infantry Division/ROK-U.S. Combined Division NCOs received certificates of completion for Battle Staff Noncommissioned Officer Course at a commencement ceremony held at the installation theater June 28. The ceremony marked the completion of the first-ever 2ID/RUCD Battle Staff NCO Course, which resulted from the desire of Division Command Sgt. Maj. Phil K. Barretto for NCOs to apply strategic thought and maintain relevancy. Sgt. Maj. Tommie L. Jones, logistics sergeant major, spearheaded the establishment of Warrior BSNCOC from the ground up. Jones said the significance of equipping NCOs with the knowledge required to plan complex operations is vital to mission success. Guest speaker Sgt. Maj. Gabriel Camacho, 2nd Infantry Division/ROK-U.S. Combined Division surgeon sergeant major addresses the graduates of Battle Staff Noncommissioned Officer Course during the commencement ceremony held at the installation theater June 28. 2nd Infantry Division/ROK-U.S. Combined Division Soldiers observe the Battle Staff Noncommissioned Officer Course commencement ceremony held at the installation theater June 28. In examining our staff, commissioned officers arrive trained while noncommissioned officers are forced to learn on their own, said Jones. By bringing the Battle Staff Course here, we are leveling the playing field. Now the noncommissioned officers on our staff can provide more relevant input and become more effective partners. The graduates took the 22-day, reverse-cycle (11 p.m. to 8:30 a.m.) course through a combination of video teletraining and practical exercises administered by the Noncommissioned Officer Leadership Center of Excellence at Fort Bliss, Texas, and instructors here. Guest speaker Sgt. Maj. Gabriel Camacho, surgeon sergeant major, commended the group for academic success and challenged graduates to maintain the significance of their training. Our division has a complex, continuous operating environment, said Camacho. When we talk about the Military Decision-Making Process, we emphasize how we support commanders and staff to make the right decisions to exercise proper mission command. Honor graduate, Staff Sgt. David K. Arnold, an operations NCO, earned the highest-grade-point average of 98.1 percent.

9 july (Left) Honor graduate Staff Sgt. David K. Arnold, an operations noncommissioned officer presents a Certificate of Appreciation on behalf on the graduating class to guest speaker Sgt. Maj. Gabriel Camacho, surgeon sergeant major, for his words of wisdom. The commencement ceremony marked the completion of the first-ever 2ID/RUCD Battle Staff NCO Course. (Bottom) Guest speaker Sgt. Maj. Gabriel Camacho, surgeon sergeant major, addresses the graduates of the 2ID/RUCD Battle Staff Noncommissioned Officer Course during the commencement ceremony held at the installation theater June 28. (Right) Command Sgt. Maj. Phil K. Barretto, 2nd Infantry Division/ROK-U.S. Combined Division command sergeant major shakes hand with Battle Staff Noncommissioned Officer graduates after a commencement ceremony at the installation theater June 28. The ceremony marked the completion of the first-ever 2ID/ RUCD Battle Staff NCO course. Arnold describes his experience in BSNCOC as challenging but rewarding. As a younger NCO, you are not normally exposed to the larger picture of how sections all work together; how one action can affect everyone else, said Arnold. BSNCOC affords you the opportunity to see how it all comes together. Other notable achievements included Master Sgt. Jermon V. Brown, an operations NCO, who earned a grade point average of 96.2 percent and Sgt. 1st Class Kenneth J. Meckel, a signal operations NCO who was recognized as the best assistant instructor during the ceremony. Due to the success of the first 2ID/RUCD BSNCOC, future courses are in the planning stages to facilitate training more battalion and higher echelon staff NCOs to serve as integral members of staff and manage daily operations. The BSNCOC graduates: Staff Sgt. David K. Arnold, Sgt. 1st Class Kenny M. Bailargeon, Sgt. 1st Class Marie Y. Boyd, Master Sgt. Jermon V. Brown, Staff Sgt. Michael E. Carroll, Sgt. Joshua D. Coston, Staff Sgt. Michael B. Davis, Sgt. 1st Class Joshua D. Elder, Sgt 1st Class Cavelle L. Horn, Staff Sgt. Kyi A. Johnson, Staff Sgt. John M. Majerus, Staff Sgt. Manuel R. Olivoalvarez, Sgt. 1st Class Wilburn S. Rose, Sgt. 1st Class Adrian Silva, Sgt. 1st Class Jeremy D. Whisler, Master Sgt. Jeffrey M. Williams.

10 10 THE INDIANHEAD CHaMPiONs in sustainment Col. Kenneth K. Williams, 2nd Infantry Division Sustainment Brigade commander, relinquishes command as he passes the colors to Maj. Gen. D. Scott McKean, commanding general, 2nd Infantry Division/ROK-U.S. Combined Division June 25. (U.S. Army photo by Cpl. E Chun Yoo, STORY BY Maj. Charles G. Fyffe and Sgt. Tanisha Karn 2nd Infantry Division Sustainment Brigade CAMP HUMPHREYS, Republic of Korea In a recent interview with Sgt. Maj. of the Army Daniel A. Dailey, readers learned of an admiration for the professionals in our sustainment enterprise. Dailey describes an unmatched level of surgical expertise in logistical knowledge of equipment and procedures. You have this depth of infrastructure that most Soldiers are unaware of that keeps them going every single day, said Dailey. Every time I see it, I am amazed at the scale and complexity of how it works and at its flexibility. Champions from the 2nd Infantry Division Sustainment Brigade are no exception. Under the leadership of Col. Kenneth K. Williams, outgoing commander of 2ID/SBDE, optimal levels of logistical support to 2nd Infantry Division/ROK-U.S. Combined Division were developed, implemented and upheld. When I took command two years ago, a sustainment brigade was a fairly new concept for 2ID/RUCD, said Williams. I had to convince the other brigade commanders that we weren t interlopers and were actually enablers, he said. Notably, 2ID/SBDE Champions completed training as part of exercise Key Resolve 2018 throughout the month of May with 2ID/RUCD. Williams used KR18 as an opportunity to develop the capability to synchronize support area efforts and conduct a proof of principle to validate the emergent concept along with verifying the combined requirements that are inherent to 2ID/RUCD, the only combined division in the U.S. Army. KR18 brought 2ID/SBDE and 2ID/RUCD together to form a sustainment collaboration comprised of the division s Support Area Command Post (SACP) and the 2ID/SBDE Tactical Operations Center. The SACP is a fairly new concept to the division. said Lt. Col. John Gaivin, the G4 logistics officer 2ID/RUCD. It s only been executed twice prior to KR 18. The establishment of a combined SACP incorporates staff members from the ROK and U.S. armies and other joint forces. Together, their work allowed effective mission command and planned sustainment operations across multiple domains while also coordinating directly with ROK military to synchronize area distribution activities that supported both ROK and U.S. forces. Soldiers of the 2nd Infantry Division Sustainment Brigade stand in formation on Warrior Field as outgoing commander, Col. Kenneth K. Williams and incoming commander, Col. Roger S. Giraud prepare to exchange the brigade colors with Maj. Gen. D. Scott McKean on Warrior Field June 25. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Terysa King, 2ID/SBDE Public Affairs) 2ID/SBDE accomplished their training goals, further enhancing their level of surgical expertise in logistics and honoring their outgoing commander s legacy. Williams relinquished command to Col. Rogers S. Giraud during a change of command ceremony held on the new 2ID/RUCD parade field June 25. Giraud approached the logistician seat with optimism, saying he is committed to ensuring the Champion Brigade will make it happen and Fight Tonight. I have tasked each Champion to lead, care, train, and sustain, said Giraud. In executing these four key tasks, the Champion Brigade will remain the premier sustainment brigade; a highly disciplined team of teams; operationally focused; proficient; and masters in providing sustainment support that is Second to None.

11 july ID Chaplains Change Responsibility in Homeland (Above) Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Hyeonjoong Kim, incoming 2nd Infantry Division ROK-U.S. Combined Division command chaplain receives the stole from presiding officer, Maj. Gen. D. Scott McKean, 2ID/RUCD, commanding general, signifying the transfer of command chaplain responsibility during the Change of Stole Ceremony held at the Warrior Chapel June 21. STORY BY Sgt. Raquel Villalona 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs PHOTOS BY Mr. Pak, Chin U. 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs CAMP RED CLOUD, Republic of Korea As the stole was laid upon the chaplain s shoulders, he humbly accepted the spiritual and religious obligation to the Soldiers and family members of the unique combined division. Maj. Gen. D. Scott McKean, commanding general, 2nd Infantry Division ROK-U.S. Combined Division presided over the transfer of 2ID/RUCD command chaplain responsibility from outgoing Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Moon H. Kim, to incoming Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Hyeonjoong Kim during the Change of Stole Ceremony at the Warrior Chapel June 21. Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Moon Kim, a native of Seoul, was recognized for his two-year ministry with the Warrior Division, providing programs across the division like Strong Bonds, ASIST training, resiliency training and alliance-strengthening events to name a few. Moon Kim is not going far as he takes over as the U.S. Army Garrison Camp Humphreys command chaplain. In departing remarks, Chaplain Moon Kim described his 14-year journey, starting as a battalion chaplain at Camp Casey in 2002 and returning as the Warrior Chaplain at Camp Red Cloud in 2016, a very rewarding one. I believe God has orchestrated this journey and pledged me here, which in itself motivated me to serve the lord and Warriors, said Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Moon H. Kim, outgoing 2ID/RUCD command chaplain. Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Hyeonjoong Kim, originally from Seoul, humbly accepted the unique responsibility of becoming the Warrior Division s command chaplain, citing that it is the last remaining permanently forward-stationed division in the U.S. Army. Hyeonjoong Kim highlighted the history of chaplains assigned to the division charged to nurture the living, care for the wounded and honor the fallen. Forty-six chaplains have served the Soldiers and family members of the Indianhead Division since 1969, Hyeonjoong Kim said. I am humbled and honored to be the 47th, the third of Korean-American descent, said Hyeonjoong Kim. As he thanked the outgoing command chaplain for a job well done and welcomed the new command chaplain, Maj. Gen. D. Scott McKean, commanding general, 2ID/RUCD, identified a unique characteristic of chaplains that isn t learned in school- sacrifice. McKean cited Korean War Medal of Honor recipient Chaplain (Capt.) Emil J. Kapaun who moved fearlessly under direct enemy fire and provided reassurance to the outnumbered Soldiers during the Battle of Unsan Nov. 2, He stayed behind to care for the wounded and became a prisoner of war himself and while in captivity he continued to provide faith and inspiration to those Soldiers and gave his own food to the wounded and dying, said McKean. That is just one of many examples of how chaplains in our ministry continue our march forward to victory. Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Hyeonjoong Kim, 2nd Infantry Division ROK-U.S. Combined Division command chaplain, addresses Warrior Division Soldiers during the Change of Stole Ceremony held at the Warrior Chapel June 21. Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Moon H. Kim, outgoing 2nd Infantry Division ROK-U.S. Combined Division command chaplain (left), Maj. Gen. D. Scott McKean, 2ID/RUCD, commanding general (center), Chaplain (Lt. Col.) Hyeonjoong Kim, incoming 2ID/RUCD command chaplain (right) face Soldiers during the Change of Stole Ceremony held at the Warrior Chapel June 21.

12 12 THE INDIANHEAD NEw warrior PHOTO BY Staff Sgt. Kimberly Jenkins 2CAB Public Affairs COMMaNdErs Ltc. Col. Ryan Sullivan, the 4-2 Attack Reconnaissance Battalion incoming battalion commander, passes the colors to Command Sgt. Maj. Luis De Jesus, the 4-2 Attack Reconnaissance Battalion, command sergeant major. 2nd Combat Aviation Brigade incoming commander Col. Brian Watkins, outgoing commander Col. Lance Calvert, and Maj. Gen. D. Scott McKean, the 2nd Infantry Division/Combined ROK/US Division, commanding general, conduct an inspection of troops as part of the 2nd Combat Aviation Brigade change of command ceremony June 15. Col. Lance Calvert and Command Sgt. Maj. Derrick Merriwether stand at the front of the formation as 2nd Combat Aviation Brigade Soldiers form up to capture a photo of the entire 2nd Combat Aviation Brigade during the brigade change of command ceremony June 15.

13 july PHOTOS BY Mr. Pak, Chin U. 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs Lt. Col. Alan E. Faye, outgoing HHBN commander, Maj. Gen. D. Scott McKean, 2nd Infantry Division ROK-U.S. Combined Division commander and Lt. Col. Steven S. Bartley, incoming HHBN commander, take part in a change of command ceremony on the Camp Red Cloud Village Green June 18. (U.S. Army Photo by Mr. Pak, Chin U., 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs) Maj. Gen. D. Scott McKean, 2nd Infantry Division ROK-U.S. Combined Division commander, passes the HHBN standard to Lt. Col. Steven S. Bartley, incoming HHBN commander, during a change of command ceremony on the Camp Red Cloud Village Green June 18. (U.S. Army Photo by Mr. Pak, Chin U., 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs) PHOTOS BY Sgt. Larry Barnhill 210 FAB Public Affairs Maj. Gen. Thomas S. James, director of operations of United Nations Command, Combined Forces Command and United States Forces Korea hands the United Nations Command Security Battalion standard to incoming commander Lt. Col. Sean M. Morrow during a change of command ceremony June 19 at the Camp Bonifas Parade Field. United Nations Command Security Battalion commander Lt. Col. Sean M. Morrow, his family and colleagues cut the new commander s cake during the reception following a change of command ceremony June 19.

14 14 THE INDIANHEAD Maj. Gen. D. Scott McKean, commanding general, 2nd Infantry Division ROK-U.S Combined Division places the combined division patch on Brig. Gen. Kim, Yong Chul, the incoming deputy commanding general for ROK at the Deputy Commanding General Patch Ceremony on the 2nd Infantry Division Parade Field June 15. (U.S. Army Photo by Mr. Pak, Chin U., 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs) 2ID HOLDS DEPUTY COMMANDING GENERAL STORY BY Sgt. Raquel Villalona 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs CAMP HUMPHREYS, Republic of Korea 2nd Infantry Division ROK- U.S. Combined Division held the Deputy Commanding General Patch Ceremony to commemorate three departing and three arriving DCGs on the new 2nd Infantry Division Parade Field June 15. Maj. Gen. D. Scott McKean, commanding general, 2nd Infantry Division ROK-U.S. Combined Division, and Command Sgt. Maj. Phil K. Barretto, 2nd Infantry Division ROK-U.S. Combined Division bid farewell to Brig. Gen. Jonathan E. Howerton, deputy commanding general-maneuver and Brig. Gen. Thomas R. Drew, deputy commanding general-support, at the patch ceremony. Brig. Gen. Kim, Tae Up, deputy commanding general- ROK, was acknowledged but not in attendance due to temporary duty assignment in Canada. It s important that we recognize his over two years of service with the 2ID/ROK-U.S. Combined Division, said McKean in reference to outgoing DCG-R, Brig. Gen. Kim. A great tribute to his talent and ability to make the ROK-U.S. alliance even stronger. The Warrior Division formally welcomed Brig. Gen. Kim, Yong Chul the incoming deputy commanding general-rok, Brig. Gen. Stephen J. Maranian, deputy commanding general-maneuver, and Col. Michael C. McCurry, deputy commanding officer-support. The 2nd Infantry Division ROK-U.S. alliance originally formed in 2015 as the first ever combined division with fully integrated ROK Army Soldiers serving alongside U.S. Soldiers, making both the partnership and the patch ceremony unique to the division. During the ceremony, McKean removed the combined division tabs from outgoing deputy commanding generals and placed them on the incoming deputy commanding generals; honoring those that served in the past and welcoming the new warriors to the team. Brig. Gen. Thomas R. Drew, outgoing deputy commanding generalsupport described the combined division as maintaining a mission-first atmosphere. I ve witnessed the we-serve motto every day of this tour, said Drew. It s such a great place to be a Soldier; being part of the 2nd Infantry Division ROK-U.S. Combined Division has truly been an honor, he said. McKean spoke on the exemplary performance of his departing brigadier generals. Both are truly selfless servants who took every opportunity to coach, teach and mentor leaders across the division. The patch ceremony is the first of its kind at Camp Humphreys, soon to be the Warrior Division s new home. The sprawling base is located nearly two hours south of Uijeongbu, the division s current location. As he thanked the outgoing DCGs for a job well done and welcomed the three new senior leaders, McKean noted that the combined division is moving forward with a demanding year ahead. The division will continue to be served by great DCGs, said McKean. I m sure this year will be just as eventful as the last. Get ready because it s a fast-moving machine.

15 july Maj. Gen. D. Scott McKean, commanding general, 2nd Infantry Division ROK-U.S Combined Division stands with outgoing (left) Brig. Gen. Jonathan E. Howerton, deputy commanding general for maneuver; Brig. Gen. Thomas R. Drew, deputy commanding general for support and incoming (right) Brig. Gen. Kim, Yong Chul, the incoming deputy commanding general for ROK, Brig. Gen. Stephen J. Maranian, deputy commanding general for maneuver, and Col. Michael C. McCurry, deputy commanding officer for support during the Deputy Commanding General Patch Ceremony on the 2nd Infantry Division Parade Field June 15. (U.S. Army Photo by Mr. Pak, Chin U., 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs) PATCH CEREMONY AT NEW HEADQUARTERS Maj. Gen. D. Scott McKean, commanding general, 2nd Infantry Division ROK-U.S Combined Division stands with outgoing (left) Brig. Gen. Jonathan E. Howerton, deputy commanding general for maneuver; Brig. Gen. Thomas R. Drew, deputy commanding general for support and incoming (right) Brig. Gen. Kim, Yong Chul, the incoming deputy commanding general for ROK, Brig. Gen. Stephen J. Maranian, deputy commanding general for maneuver, and Col. Michael C. McCurry, deputy commanding officer for support during the Deputy Commanding General Patch Ceremony on the 2nd Infantry Division Parade Field June 15. (U.S. Army Photo by Mr. Pak, Chin U., 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs)

16 16 THE INDIANHEAD Col. Brandon D. Newton, U.S. Army Garrison Camp Red Cloud and Area I commander, commences the U.S. Army Garrison Camp Red Cloud Inactivation Ceremony at the Village Green June 21. The ceremony is a milestone in the transformation and relocation process agreed upon by the ROK and U.S. governments. (U.S. Army Photo by Mr. Pak, Chin U., 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs) Historic Casing of U.S. Army Garrison STORY BY Sgt. Raquel Villalona 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs CAMP RED CLOUD, Republic of Korea The casing of the U.S. Army Garrison Camp Red Cloud colors marked a historic milestone in the Land Partnership Plan, the transformation and relocation process agreed upon by the ROK and U.S. governments. U.S. Army Garrison (USAG) Camp Red Cloud, Installation Management Command (IMCOM)-Pacific, held an inactivation ceremony to case the garrison colors and pay tribute to Col. Brandon D. Newton, USAG Red Cloud and Area I commander, on the Village Green June 21. USAG Camp Red Cloud, located in the bustling city of Uijeongbu, has served as the home to the 2nd Infantry Division for 68 years. It provided a plethora of services and base support, similar to those needed to run a small city, to thousands of Soldiers, civilians, and their Families. In keeping with the IMCOM motto to sustain, support, and defend, services ranged from Directorate of Public Works, training facilities, barracks maintenance, dining facilities, official mail distribution centers, amongst many others needed to accomplish expeditionary operations. These resources do not simply end with the casing of the colors, but will transfer to the larger installations as personnel and equipment continue to transition over the remainder of the year. Dr. Christine Altendorf, IMCOM-Pacific director, Col. Brandon D. Newton, USAG Red Cloud and Area I commander, and Command Sgt. Maj. Jason R. Copeland, USAG Camp Casey senior enlisted leader, cased the USAG Camp Red Cloud colors. In casing the USAG Camp Red Cloud colors, Altendorf said the ceremony marks an opportunity to pay tribute to all who have lived and served at the camp throughout the years. We close a chapter in history, but as we all know history does not go away, said Altendorf. It makes us what we are today and it teaches us how to be better in the future. Altendorf also praised the leaders, past and present, who worked together to take care of the Soldiers, families and civilians who called Camp Red Cloud home. This is where Americans from every state and territory locked arms with our Korean comrades and friends to form an iron-clad alliance, said Altendorf. Recognized as the last USAG-Camp Red Cloud garrison commander, Newton maintained committed to support excellence throughout his two-year command during the ongoing transformation. Notably, he led the Area I garrison team through eight large command post exercises and strategically allocated resources to ensure the garrison was operationally effective and well trained to accomplish its mission.

17 july Col. Brandon D. Newton, U.S. Army Garrison Camp Red Cloud and Area I commander, gives a speech during the U.S. Army Garrison Camp Red Cloud Inactivation Ceremony at the Village Green June 21. (U.S. Army Photo by Mr. Pak, Chin U., 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs) (Top) Col. Brandon D. Newton, U.S. Army Garrison Camp Red Cloud and Area I commander, Dr. Christine Altendorf, Installation Management Command-Pacific director, and Command Sgt. Maj. Jason R. Copeland, U.S. Army Garrison Camp Casey senior enlisted leader, case the U.S. Army Garrison Camp Red Cloud colors during the U.S. Army Garrison Camp Red Cloud Inactivation Ceremony at the Village Green June 21. The casing of the USAG Camp Red Cloud colors recognizes the garrisons 68 years of service and base support. (U.S. Army Photo by Mr. Pak, Chin U., 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs) (Left) Col. Brandon D. Newton, U.S. Army Garrison Camp Red Cloud and Area I commander presents the colors to the reviewing officer, Dr. Christine Altendorf, Installation Management Command-Pacific director, during the U.S. Army Garrison Camp Red Cloud Inactivation Ceremony at the Village Green June 21. The ceremony is a milestone in the transformation and relocation process agreed upon by U.S. and ROK governments. (U.S. Army Photo by Mr. Pak, Chin U., 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs) Camp Red Cloud Colors Col. Brandon D. Newton, U.S. Army Garrison Camp Red Cloud and Area I commander, commences the U.S. Army Garrison Camp Red Cloud Inactivation Ceremony at the Village Green June 21. The ceremony is a milestone in the transformation and relocation process agreed upon by U.S. and ROK governments. (U.S. Army Photo by Mr. Pak, Chin U., 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs) In farewell remarks, Newton remembered posthumous Medal of Honor recipient, Cpl. Mitchell Red Cloud, and asked Soldiers not to forget the historic Area I locations also named after heroes: Sears, Essayons, LaGuardia, Kyle, Falling Waters, Indian, Stanley and Jackson. These camps saw the fabric of the alliance built, and saw the passage of time, and the maintenance of peace on the Korean Peninsula, said Newton. As we case the garrison colors, we pay tribute to the thousands of Soldiers, civilians, KATUSAs, and Korean Service Corps members who have labored in support of Camp Red Cloud for over 60 years. Newton said the community surrounding Camp Red Cloud and other Area I camps will forever be touched by the spirit of those who were there. Noting a section of brick wall in the Uijeongbu Train Station Park that now serves as a monument to the Camp Falling Waters, he outlined historic Area I relics that remain as reminders of the past, and that now serve as bustling places of development commerce, and expansion. He also mentioned the 2nd Inf. Div. monument and time capsule put in place in October by Uijeongbu Mayor Ahn Byung-yong and 2ID/RUCD commander Maj. Gen. D. Scott McKean to mark the division s centennial birthday. For all those that have served here, this is a bittersweet moment, one that we can be proud of and smile upon, said Altendorf. We take with us our commitment to excellence for those we support and our long legacy of service to both of our nations.

18 18 THE INDIANHEAD 243RD ARMY BIRTHDAY Eighth Army hosted the 243rd Army Birthday Ball June 1 at the SINTEX Convention Center in Hwaseong. The night was filled with tradition, camaraderie, and reverence. The U.S. Army is the oldest of the military branches and is one year older than the U.S. Lt. Gen. Michael A. Bills, Eighth Army commanding general, and Command Sgt. Maj. Richard E. Merritt, Eighth Army command sergeant major, present Army Commendation Medals to the winners of the Eighth Army Best Warrior Competition. (Photo Credit: Pfc. Seo, Wonjin, Eighth Army Public Affairs) Soldiers wearing historic U.S. Army uniforms stand in line during the 243rd Army Birthday Ball at the SINTEX Convention Center in Hwaseong June 1. The uniforms represent different eras throughout the Army s history. (Photo Credit: Cpl. Kang, Seungya, Eighth Army Public Affairs) Gen. Vincent K. Brooks, the commander of United Nations Command/Combined Forces Command/United States Forces Korea, served as the guest speaker at the 243rd Army Birthday Ball June 1 at the SINTEX Convention Center in Hwaseong. Brooks spoke about the history of the U.S./ROK alliance. (Photo Credit: Spc. ShaTyra Reed, 20th Public Affairs Detachment)

19 july ID CELEBRATES 243RD ARMY BIRTHDAY CAMP RED CLOUD CAMP HUMPHREYS CAMP HOVEY CAMP CASEY

20 The COEX The COEX, Convention and Exhibition Center is a large-scale business town established on September 7, 1988, primarily for domestic and overseas businessmen. Business operations can be managed easily as assembly halls, exhibition halls, the Korean City Air Terminal, the Intercontinental Hotel, and Hyundai Department Store are assembled in one spot. Coex Mall was re-opened on November 27, 2014 after the completion of a large-scale renovation. Worldrenowned architectural firm Gensler worked to create a vision for change largely centered around a concept called The Unfolding Sky. With five uniquely-themed squares, the new Coex Mall was designed to receive optimal amounts of natural light and optimize the flow of foot traffic. Coex Mall is a shopping mecca for global brands in fashion, accessories, beauty, lifestyle, and others. It also has a large movie theater complex and a wide variety of fine dining establishments. #TravelSeoul Daehangno Street Daehangno Street, known as the street for young people, is the former location of Seoul National University. In the 1980s, many theater groups started moving to Daehangno, and it soon developed into a cultural center. In a short period of time, movie theaters, live-cafes, regular cafes and pubs sprung up, and it grew into an entertainment district. Its popularity is still maintained by famous small theaters such as Parangsae (Blue Bird) Theater and Hakjeong Theater, and some 30 additional theaters have concentrated here to contribute in keeping Daehangno as the root of performance art in Korea. The center of Daehangno, Marronnier Park, has frequent live acts and dance performances by young people. This is why Daehangno is called the Play Mecca and Young Street as well. Another reason Daehangno became so popular with young people is the various interesting sights and food to be found here. Many restaurants, fast food joints, cafes, and bars are concentrated here, making it convenient for people to find something to do after plays and live-performances. Its unique atmosphere and space continues to be loved by many young people. KOREA TOURISM ORGANIZATION

21 TH BATTALION 23RD INFANTRY REGIMENT Coat of Arms Insignia CONSTITUTION OF 1st REGIMENT The 4th Battalion, 23rd Infantry was first constituted on 3 May 1861 in the Regular Army as Company D, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry and organized on 8 July 1861 at Fort Trumbull, Connecticut. It was redesignated on 30 April 1862 as Company D, 2d Battalion, 14th Infantry. During the US Civil War, the unit participated in 12 campaigns: Peninsula, Manassas, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, Petersburg, Virginia 1862, and Virginia HISTORY/ 2ID RELATIONSHIP For the First World War, the 23rd Infantry Regiment as a whole was assigned on 22 September 1917 to the 2nd Division (later redesignated as the 2nd Infantry Division). The unit participated in 6 campaigns during the First World War: Aisne, Aisne-Marne, St. Mihiel, MeuseArgonne, IIe de France 1918, and Lorraine Company D, 23rd Infantry also participated in the Second World War with the 2nd Infantry Division, being awarded credit for participation in 5 campaigns: Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Ardennes-Alsace, and Central Europe. When the 2nd Infantry Division was sent to Korea, the 23rd Infantry Regiment, including Company D, followed. The unit participated in 10 campaigns of the Korean War: UN Defensive, UN Offensive, CCF Intervention, First UN Counteroffensive, CCF Spring Offensive, UN Summer-Fall Offensive, Second Korean Winter, Korea Summer-Fall 1952, Third Korean Winter, and Korea Summer The unit was inactivated on 20 June 1957 at Fort Richardson, Alaska, and relieved from assignment to the 2nd Infantry Division. It was concurrently, redesignated as Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Battle Group, 23rd Infantry. It was activated on 25 January 1963 at Fort Richardson, Alaska with its organic elements concurrently constituted and activated.

22 2018 년 7 월 VOL. 55 ISSUE 07 인디언헤드 INDIANHEAD KOREAN EDITION

23 인디언헤드 2018년 7월 2018 년 7 월간추린뉴스 매달영문판에는들어가지만한글판에는들어가지않는기사들을보면서아깝다는생각을했습니다. 그래서만들었습니다! 간추린뉴스! 한글판에는넣지않았지만, 영문판에실린기사들을사진으로정리하는지면입니다. 이달의사진 제 2 보병사단공식페이스북페이지많은좋아요와공유하기부탁드립니다. 표지사진 : 6 월 15 일, 캠프험프리에서열린제 2 보병사단 / 한미연합사단에서새롭게한국측부사령관으로임명된김용철준장이식의진행을지켜보고있다. 이달의사진 : 6 월 21 일, 캠프레드클라우드에서이루어진기지해단식에서시설관리사령부 (IMCOM- Pacific) 장인알텐도르프박사가하강한기지깃발을기지와에어리어원사령관인브랜든뉴튼대령에게건네고있다. 글꼴배포처아리따체 : AMOREPACIFIC 함초롱체 : 한글과컴퓨터그외인터넷에서무료로배포한폰트를사용했습니다.

24 인디언헤드 2018년 7월 캠프케이시에서영어캠프가열리다 3-69 기갑여단소속장병들과봉사자들, 그리고학생들이캠프케이시영화관에서캠프를종료하기전단체사진을찍고있다. < 사진 _ 상병김성준 / 1 기갑여단전투단공보실 > 카투사와미군들은학생들에게각종장비들의사용법과그전에선행되야하는장비예방점검법에대해영어로서로소통하면서설명을하였다. 50 구경기관총에대한설명이끝난후, 카투사와미군들은학생들에게서로다른종류의장비들에대한질문을했고학생들로하여금직접장비들을조작해볼수있는기회도주었다. 또한학생들은군용전투차량에탑승하는게어떤느낌인지이해하기위해에이브람스전차와브래들리장갑차에직접올라타기도하였다. 더나아가학생들은기관총을자세히살펴보면서 1 분에몇발까지사격이가능한지, 조준은어떻게하는지, 그리고조준시호흡을어떻게조절해야하는지에대해서도배웠다. 69 기갑연대, 3 대대중대본부장인로널드페허대위 (Capt. Ronald Feher) 는 캠프케이시에지역사회이웃들을초대해서우리가한국에서어떤일을하는지보여줄수있어서기쁩니다. 라고말했다. 수송부모터풀을떠나고난뒤, 학생들을케이시체육관에들어가기전캠프케이시내부를관광하였다. 케이시체육관에서는, 학생들과미군그리고카투사들은같이농구를하면서서로질문을하며서로에대해알게되는시간을가졌다. 로널드페허대위는 학생들과미군, 그리고카투사들이서로즐거워하는모습들을우리들이지속적으로지역사회와의유대관계를돈독히하고영어캠프를계속지원해야함을깨닫게되었습니다. 라고말하였다. 캠프를종료하기전, 69 기갑연대, 3 대대사령관이윌리엄코옐중령이나타나케이시영화관에서학생들과일일이대화를나누었으며영어캠프참석증을나눠주기전에그들에게캠프에대해여러질문을하였다. 코엘중령은 저는저희대대가한국에서장비를어떻게운용하는지여러분들에게소개할수있는기회를갖게되어서매우다행이라생각합니다. 라고말했다. 저희영어캠프에참석해주셔서감사하고여러분들이저희지역사회에일원인것이매우반갑습니다. 라고도덧붙였다. 대한민국캠프케이시 - 지난 6 월 6 일캠프케이시에서는동두천시에서 40 여명의한국인학생들을초대하여부대와캠프를소개하는 캠프케이시 (Camp Casey) 1 일영어캠프 행사가열렸다. 해당영어캠프는미육군과동두천시민들간의유대관계를돈독히하는데에일조하는지역유대강화프로그램의일종이다. 3 보병사단, 1 기갑여단전투단, 69 기갑연대, 3 대대소속미군과카투사들이프로그램진행을맡았다. 이중 3-69 기갑연대 (3-69 Armor Regiment) 소속미군들은학생들에게 M1 에이브람스전차와 M2 브래들리장갑차를소개해줬다. ( 위 )1 기갑여단전투단소속장병들이학생들에게 M2 브래들리장갑차에대해설명을해주고있다. < 사진 _ 상병김성준 / 1 기갑여단전투단공보실 > ( 아래 )1 기갑여단전투단소속장병들이 M242 기관포에대해캠프를방문한학생들에게설명해주고있다. < 사진 _ 상병김성준 / 1 기갑여단전투단공보실 > < 기사 _ 하사콰네샤바넷 / 1 기갑여단전투단공보처 > < 번역 _ 일병박승호 / 제 2 보병사단공보처 >

25 인디언헤드 2018년 7월 ( 위 ) 캠프레드클라우드와에어리어원사령관인브랜든뉴튼대령이캠프레드클라우드빌리지그린에서열린캠프레드클라우드해단식의개회를선언하고있다.< 사진 _ 제 2 보병사단공보처사진전문가박진우 > ( 아래 ) IMCOM-Pacific 의국장인크리스틴알텐도프박사 (Dr. Christine Altendorf) 가캠프레드클라우드와에어리어원사령관인브랜든뉴튼대령에게하강한기지의깃발을전달하고있다. < 사진 _ 제 2 보병사단공보처사진전문가박진우 > < 기사 _ 병장라켈비야로나 / 제2보병사단공보처 > < 번역 _ 일병박승호 / 제2보병사단공보처 >

26 인디언헤드 2018년 7월 제 2 보병사단 / 한미연합사단첫부사령관임명식을거행하다 < 사진 _ 제 2 보병사단공보처사진전문가박진우 > < 기사 _ 병장라켈비야로나 / 제 2 보병사단공보처 > < 번역 _ 일병박승호 / 제 2 보병사단공보처 >

27 인디언헤드 2018년 7월 < 기사 _ 병장라켈비야로나 / 제 2 보병사단공보처 > < 번역 _ 일병박승호 / 제 2 보병사단공보처 >

28 The BSNCOC graduates: Staff Sgt. David K. Arnold, Sgt. 1st Class Kenny M. Bailargeon, Sgt. 1st Class Marie Y. Boyd, Master Sgt. Jermon V. Brown, Staff Sgt. Michael E. Carroll, Sgt. Joshua D. Coston, Staff Sgt. Michael B. Davis, Sgt. 1st Class Joshua D. Elder, Sgt. 1st Class Joshua D. Elder, Sgt 1st Class Cavelle L. Horn, Staff Sgt. Kyi A. Johnson, Staff Sgt. John M. Majerus, Staff Sgt. Manuel R. Olivoalvarez, Sgt. 1st Class Wilburn S. Rose, Sgt. 1st Class Adrian Silva, Sgt. 1st Class Jeremy D. Whisler, Master Sgt. Jeffrey M. Williams. 인디언헤드 2018년 7월 < 사진 _ 일병박승호 / 제 2 보병사단공보실 > ( 위 ) 최우수졸업생인데이비드아놀드하사가모든졸업생들을대표하여카마초주임원사에게공로장을건네주고있다. ( 왼쪽아래 ) 특별초청연사인카마초의무주임원사가졸업생들에게수료축하연설을하고있다. ( 오른쪽아래 ) 기졸업생들과수료식에참석한모든미군장병들과부사관들이기립하여미국국가 ( ) 를제창하고있다. 한미문화교류 식민지배를겪었던여느나라들과같이미국에도역시독립기념일이존재하며매년 7 월 4 일날로지정되어있다. 미국독립기념일은이름이뜻하는바와는약간달리실제로미국이영국의지배에서공식적으로벗어난것을기념하는날이아니다 년 7 월 4 일당시영국의지배하에있었던미국의 13 개주가연합하여제 2 차대륙회의이후필라델피아인디펜던스홀에서미국독립선언문을채택한것을기념하는것이다. 실제로미국의공식적인독립은해당선언문의채택이후인 1783 년 9 월 3 일에영국과프랑스간의파리조약을통해이루어졌다. 이런면에서바라보면일본의지배를받았던한국의광복절 (8.15) 보다는삼일절 (3.1) 과그성격이유사하다볼수있다. 미국독립기념일이공식지정된이후, 미국에서는새로운주가연방에가입하면가입한후맞이하는첫독립기념일에주의깃발을바꾸는것이관례이다. 미국의대표적인연방공휴일로서이날대부분의가족들은미국국기의색깔인하얀색, 파랑색, 빨간색이섞인풍선이나옷을입고소풍을나가하루를즐긴다고한다. 또한저녁이되면미국전주에서다량의폭죽을쏘아올리며미국의독립을축하하는행사를한다.